Lady Helen trilogy by Alison Goodman

Lady Helen trilogy was released by Viking from 2016 onward with an installment every year. You will find reviews for books one and two on this website. It is very difficult to review the third installment in a trilogy without giving things away so I have decided to review the series as a whole.

Goodman’s research is expansive and easily seen in the details that bring Lady Helen’s world to life. The clothing, the culture, the rites and rituals of high society all feels so close to life. Goodman’s worldbuilding and fantasy, too, are carefully thought out with no holes for logic to escape. What I particularly liked about this series is how immersive it is. The feminism in it is true to its time and articulated brilliantly at times. The chemistry between Helen and Carlston is *fans self*.

The plot twists are numerous and the story keeps you wondering. I did guess who the eventual person…villain was in book one though so I did feel that the protagonists not even questioning him was a bit odd. I mean, it was obvious. No one is that perfect. But that just may be.

If you are in the mood for something historical with a female protagonist who is smart and deadly, with smoldering romance, you should give this series a try. You might lose hours if not days sunk into the glory of the world Goodman has created.

Review: A Dastardly Plot by Christopher Healy

Review: A Dastardly Plot by Christopher Healy

This autumn, Christopher Healy, author of the Hero’s Guide books—which made me chuckle uncontrollably in public—released the first novel in an all-new rollicking Middle Grade series: A Perilous Journey of Danger and Mayhem: A Dastardly Plot. It’s 1883—the Age of Invention! In the back of an unassuming New York City pickle shop, twelve-year-old Molly Pepper […]

Rereading: The Deadly Dance by Cora Taylor

Rereading: The Deadly Dance by Cora Taylor

At some point in my childhood I read Cora Taylor’s The Deadly Dance. Having finally (re)discovered what the book I remembered was actually called (I remembered: bull dance. time travel. Crete. eating disorder. a scene by the hotel pool. an earthquake. an escape. a scene at the airport with her (reincarnated?) disabled crush and a very […]

Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr

Dragonfly Song by Wendy Orr

The whispers say it’s not true that the Lady’s firstborn died at birth. They say it’s worse–the baby was born with an extra thumb dangling from each wrist. If she’s not perfect, she can never follow in her mother’s footsteps. On a tiny Mediterranean island during the Bronze Age, Aissa is not supposed to exist. […]

Clutch by Heather Camlot

Clutch by Heather Camlot

Whenever people talk about Pa, they call him a real kind man, a real mensch. He’d give anyone store credit. You don’t have to be a millionaire businessman like Simon Bernstein to know that letting customers walk out with free groceries is a terrible money-making strategy. I’m definitely sure it’s the reason we’re trapped in […]

Soupy Leaves Home by Cecil Castellucci and Jose Pimienta

Soupy Leaves Home by Cecil Castellucci and Jose Pimienta

Soupy Leaves Home by Cecil Castellucci and Jose Pimienta is one of my favourite books read this year. (I mean. It’s only March, but I’ve done a lot of reading. The book award selection committee life, y’all. It’s intense.) Here’s what the back cover has to say: When Pearl runs away from her abusive father, […]

Pandas on the Eastside by Gabrielle Prendergast

Pandas on the Eastside by Gabrielle Prendergast

2017/2018 Red Cedar Fiction nominee Pandas on the Eastside by Gabrielle Prendergast is the story of Journey Wind Song Flanagan, who loves her community and all the people that form it. The year is 1972. “There’s a Chinese boat down at the docks. You know about it?” “I heard, yes.” “I need to speak to someone from […]